Med. Weter. 75 (12), 759762, 2019

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AGNIESZKA WISZNIEWSKA-ŁASZCZYCH, BEATA WYSOK, JOANNA WOJTACKA, JOANNA SZTEYN, MIROSŁAW M. MICHALSKI, MARTA SOŁTYSIUK
High seroprevalence of Toxoplasma gondii antibodies in wild boars hunted in the Game Breeding Center in north-eastern Poland
Toxoplasmosis is a cosmopolitan zoonotic disease caused by Toxoplasma gondii, an intracellular protozoan. The main source of infection for humans is meat contaminated with tissue cysts, the main invasive form of the parasite. The muscle tissue of seropositive animals of the family Suidae, subfamily Sus (domestic pig, wild boar) are the most common sources of infections with Toxoplasma gondii. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of T. gondii infections in the meat of wild boars (Sus scrofa) based on measurements of T. gondii antibodies in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). One hundred samples of muscle tissue were obtained from wild boars hunted in the Game Breeding Center in north-eastern Poland. The animals were divided into three age groups: weaners (27), subadults (38) and adults (35). The prevalence of toxoplasmosis was very high in the analyzed population, and 71% of the animals were classified as seropositive in ELISA. Antibodies against T. gondii were detected in 62.9% of weaners, 73.6% of subadults and 74.2% of adult boars. The seroprevalence of T. gondii antibodies was significantly higher in the animals hunted in the Game Breeding Center in comparison with the national average determined by other authors. Such extensive spread of the parasite in the natural environment can be attributed to geographic location, landform, presence of waterbodies, local climate, the size of the wild boar population and the spread of castor bean ticks (Ixodes ricinus).
Keywords: Toxoplasma gondii, wild boar, ELISA, meat